2020 Crazy Quilt Block Challenge Block – #2

2020 Crazy Quilt Block Challenge Block # 2

A Plan Emerges

Before I get into the highlights of block two, I want to tell you about my plan.  I started this challenge with no real plan other than the goal of adding 2020 items to a crazy quilt.  However, that has changed. I wanted to share an idea I’ve got rattling around in my brain. I know I’m going to have at least 100 blocks when I finish this project.  The problem is this:  How I am I going to put all the blocks together and what will be on the next 98 blocks.

In the training I’ve received in the last two years, I’ve learn there are essentially, two ways to approach making and embellishing quilt blocks (especially crazy quilt blocks): One, is to plan as much of the block you are able, insuring the block is balanced both in regards to the fabrics used and the embellishments used. The other is to work organically or by inspiration of the moment.  This means no planning you just lay fabric and embellishments down and if it looks good then it’s sewn down.  Personally, I like to plan it out before I begin, even right down to the placement of seam treatments, beads and charms.  So, with all this information and inspiration tumbling around in my mind, I let my subconscious deal with it as I slept a few nights. A couple of mornings later, I was rewarded with a fantastic idea.

I remembered a couple of years ago, I picked up a pamphlet from a trip to the Olympic Rain Forest and have kept it because it has this awesome picture done by artist and illustrator, John Dawson. The picture is collage of Olympic forest animals in their habitats. I have kept this pamphlet as inspiration.  It’s a miracle I found it especially after moving. I only had to look in three boxes.  Now I need to figure out how I’m going breakdown the picture and turn it into manageable segments, to make my interpretation of it. I am not going to copy it. It will be exciting to see how this develops.

Ta-Da, here is block number two.

 

I drafted this block myself, it is the first block I have drafted .  It is constructed with 6 fabrics, 2 flat laces, 19 threads, 3 silk ribbons, 6 embroidery techniques, and 5 seam treatments.  Other embellishments include 24 different beads, 3 sequins, and 5 glass heart beads. There is a total count of 222 beads used on this block.

 

 

 

 

The Bead and Embroidery Techniques are:

 

An embroidered beaded bird

 

An embroidered beaded daisy like flower

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Three Forget-Me-Not Flowers beaded with 4 mm glass beads (6 white for the petals and 1 brown for the center) are stitched onto Back Stitched stocks. The embroidered Queen Anne’s Lace Flowers have been embellished with tiny 12/0 white pearl seed beads.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A beaded dragonfly with embroidered silk ribbon wings

 

 

 

 

                                         A beaded lace basket motif

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An Embroidered Monogram B is embellished with 12/0 brown seed beads,  Bullion Stitched roses and rose buds  and tiny 12-0 pearl seed beads add further embellishment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Each of the flat laces are embellished with beads and embroidery.

The lace above the dragonfly has Detached Chain Stitches which form little flowers. Each flower has a 11/0 teal seed bead sewn into the flowers’ centers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The lace in the upper left-hand corner is embellished with 12/0 pearl seed bead is sewn onto the lace.

 

Total Embellishments Used on Block # 2:   65 

Cumulative Total:   112

I continue to use my record keeping pages, so I will know what I’ve used so far.

Until next time,

Kathy

by

I grew up in Yakima, which is located in Central Eastern Washington. I am married and have four adult children, eight grandchildren, with one more due to arrive in late January or early February 2016. I graduated from Central Washington University with a degree Education. I currently live in Western Washington. I learned to quilt in high school. My grandmother taught me to crochet and embroidery. I am passing this knowledge along to my daughters, granddaughters and anyone else who wants to learn these arts.

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